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    A PREMIUM TECH NIGHT OWL LIVE EXPERIENCE! Welcome to Tech Night Owl+! For a low monthly or annual subscription fee, you will receive access to an ad-free higher-resolution version of The Tech Night Owl LIVE and other exclusive content. For more information and simple signup instructions, click here.

    DOWNLOAD — Free Version: This week, we are joined by Daniel Rubino, executive editor of Windows Central,who covers a few key stories from the tech world, starting with an historical view of Skype, after Gene complains yet again about the glitches in the latest Mac version. The discussion moves to Microsoft’s decision to withdraw a faulty Windows 10 upgrade for October, 2018, due to critical problems, such as user files being erased. And what about the decision by Google to discontinue its Plus social network after a serious security flaw, hidden by Google, was revealed? Daniel will also discuss Microsoft Surface lineup, and how it serves to influence the rest of the PC industry.

    You’ll also hear from commentator Josh Centers, Managing Editor for TidBITS, and author of “Take Control of Apple TV” and other titles, who covers Apple’s expected TV programming, and how it might be presented. What about the new rumors of an updated TV app that will showcase the programs free and present other streaming services for in-app purchases? Does the world need yet another streaming service? What about Google’s decision to cancel Plus next year, which is yet another service the search giant has canceled over the years. Did it ever stand a chance against Facebook? What about Facebook’s own security problems, and will that ultimately lead to another social network eventually catching fire and taking over the market? Consider that young people these days are mainly focusing on YouTube, which is owned by Google.

    Click to hear our latest episode: The Tech Night Owl Live — October 13, 2018

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    Special Notice to Readers!

    September 29th, 2018

    The Tech Night Owl debuted in its original form and format in 1999; it was upgraded to WordPress to its current design in 2006.

    My son, Grayson, and I started The Tech Night Owl LIVE in 2002, and it became part of the GCN network in 2010.

    I have complete archives for the radio show, and all episodes since 2007 are available online via iTunes and our site.

    In order to right my personal finances and prepare for the future, wherever it leads, I have decided to put up The Tech Night Owl and the radio show for sale.

    If you wish to make an offer, please contact me directly: Gene Steinberg

    Peace,
    Gene


    Newsletter Issue #971: A Predictable Apple Event with a Predictable Outcome

    September 20th, 2018

    In the run-up to Apple’s September 12th media event last week, there was speculation aplenty. But most of it coalesced on three new iPhones and an Apple Watch Series 4, the new operating systems under test since June — and not much else.

    This is not to say that Apple’s announcements were disappointing. The new products are tempting, particularly one reasonably affordable iPhone that I’ll mention shortly. But it may well be that the Apple Watch Series 4 turned out to be the star of the show.

    But I’m getting ahead of myself.

    Continue Reading…


    A New Way To Deliver an Apple TV? Give Them Away!

    August 22nd, 2018

    It’s no secret that the Apple TV isn’t doing terribly well compared to similar gear from Amazon, Google and market leader Roku. While Apple was the pioneer in this space, it took far too long to modernize the product.

    Even when Apple introduced an all-new model in 2015, it made it much more expensive, yet still lacking 4K support at a time when tens of millions of TV sets featured the higher resolution capability. So it left the customers with a dilemma. If they still wanted to stick with the Apple ecosystem, the entry-level 32GB model was $149, compared to $99 for the third generation model before it was discounted.

    I suppose some might have found the new features, which included an enhanced remote, and Siri and app support, to be reasonably compelling, but did it really matter? How many people really strayed beyond iTunes and Netflix anyway.

    In 2017, Apple discovered 4K. Rather than keep the same price, or, better, reduce it, the entry-level unit was priced $30 higher. This may have been necessary to the bean counters who evaluated such matters as the price of raw materials and such, but it made even less sense.

    Continue Reading...


    Newsletter Issue #970: The Night Owl Takes a Cautionary Approach to macOS Mojave

    August 8th, 2018

    On the surface, it may seem that macOS Mojave is an extremely minor update. Other than Dark Mode and the reliance on Metal graphics, it doesn’t seem a whole lot different when you look it over, as I did starting last month. But the mere fact of choosing Metal means that Macs without support for that graphics technology have been made obsolete.

    Before Mojave was announced, I had planned (hoped) to test the betas on my 2010 17-inch MacBook Pro. Obviously that’s not possible, despite the fact that it has an SSD formatted with the APFS file system. That’s because its graphics hardware, state of the art eight years ago, preceded the arrival of Metal.

    A 2012 MacBook Pro,  where a Retina display debuted on Macs, works just fine. So do older Mac Pros with graphics cards that support Metal. So, my only option was the iMac. With a Fusion drive, it lost out on the APFS conversion last year, because Apple couldn’t make it compatible. It appeared on the early betas of High Sierra, but was soon pulled.

    Continue Reading…