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  • Panic, Apple Prices and Walled Gardens

    October 4th, 2017

    So let’s put this all together now: Apple allegedly sells higher-priced gear than the competition, yet puts significant restrictions on the use of these devices. You have to accept Apple’s ecosystem — make that walled garden — in order to buy Apple.

    It may, to some degree, be akin to joining a cult where the leaders, managed by CEO (High Priest) Tim Cook, tell you what to do, what to buy, and what to install on your devices. Well, that’s the impression some might want to convey, but it makes a lot more sense to parse these claims and see if there is any factual basis to them.

    Of course, on the surface, they do seem a bit much. But it’s worth putting the claims through a fact-check process anyway.

    So the first complaint is about the price, that Apple deliberately charges high prices to gouge customers. They should be charging less, and in fact competing with mainstream gear.

    Now obviously, Apple has the right to charge what it wants. It’s up to customers to decide if the prices are fair. If not, there are other choices. What’s more, Apple does cut prices from time to time. A key example is the 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display. Prices dropped until they were the same as the older models with regular displays.

    For months we heard endless complaints about the thousand dollar price for what became the iPhone X. But it was then known as the iPhone 8 until, of course, the iPhone 7s became the iPhone 8.

    Take a deep breath please!

    The price was real, well $999 for the 64GB version is close enough. But since the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 doesn’t cost a whole lot less, well $70 less, the argument that Apple is price gouging seems a tad lame. Sure, it’s more expensive than the Samsung, but the difference is very small if you up for one of those 24-month lease/purchase deals, less than $3 per month.

    Is the iPhone X worth a little more money? That’s up to prospective customers to decide. If not, Apple might eventually cut the prices. That’s what was done with the original iPhone in 2007.

    Apple is also attacked for alleged high prices on product upgrades. You want to buy a MacBook upgraded to 16GB RAM, it’s $200 extra. There’s no choice, since RAM is soldiered to the motherboard. On the other hand, when you compare the cost of RAM and storage upgrades at Apple with similar upgrades on gear from mainstream PC makers, such as Dell and HP, you’ll find the prices are in roughly in the same league.

    The real complaint is that Apple only produces a few models where you can upgrade RAM yourself. Technically you can upgrade the storage on an iMac, but you really don’t want to make the attempt. And then there’s the Mac Pro, and the promise of a modular version, easy to upgrade, perhaps by next year.

    What about being forced to tolerate Apple’s ecosystem?

    Well, having products that integrate with one another, and allow you to switch from one to the other and continue your work ought to be a good thing. Similar apps and similar services mean that you can work more efficiently. No other platform can match it! Microsoft tried, but Windows Phone crashed and burned.

    Isn’t reasonably smooth product integration supposed to be a good thing?

    Now the walled garden means that you are limited to the App Store on all Apple gear except for the Mac. It means Apple curates the apps, and you may run up against some limits in what you can get. I have complained, for example, about not having the equivalent of Rogue Amoeba’s Audio Hijack on an iPad. It’s an app that lets you capture audio from multiple sources and save them as a single audio file. It’s essential for my radio shows.

    Since Apple clearly wants to make iPads more useful as productive tools, and the enhanced multitasking of iOS 11 demonstrates that commitment, perhaps some of the limits for app developers will be removed going forward.

    But limiting you to one official app resource provides a much higher level of security, and at least a basic assurance that the app will run. There are few guarantees on the Android platform with Google Play. To use an outside app source on an iOS device, it has to be jailbroken, which creates serious security vulnerabilities. Android users can sideload apps from other sources if they want.

    So Apple’s policy probably makes more sense for most people even if some of us chafe at a few restrictions.

    On the Mac, nothing stops you from running the apps you want, good or bad. The Mac App Store is but one resource. And you can easily run Windows with Boot Camp, and loads of different operating systems via virtual machines. All official, all supported.

    In that sense, the Mac is far more flexible than a Windows PC. While you can hack some PCs to run the macOS, it comes with lots of babysitting to induce even simple functions to work on a Hackintosh, such as messaging. Some things never quite work without jumping through hoops.

    The long and short of it is that users of Apple gear have lots of freedom to do what they want, the way they want. I’ve only occasionally run across restrictions in doing what I want on the Apple mobile gadgets I’ve owned, and since Apple has expanded opportunities for iOS developers, some of those restrictions may eventually go away.

    If Apple’s pricing and ecosystem are too stifling for you, rather than complain about the company’s well-known and highly successful policies, nothing stops you from buying something else. Apple obviously cannot tell you how to spend your money.



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    5 Responses to “Panic, Apple Prices and Walled Gardens”

    1. dfs says:

      Okay, Gene riddle me this. If Apple is so all-fire concerned about security and if this the motive for their “walled garden” approach, why don’t they give their users the ability to switch off the cameras on the iMac (and maybe some or all laptops, I’ve never used one so I don’t know)?

    2. dfs says:

      Wrong. Check out such items as the ones below (and you can easily find tons more by googling). If Apple knows that these things can be done, and surely it does, and if it has taken no countermeasures after all these years, that’s pretty damn irresponsible and is schizophrenically inconsistent with their usual obsession with security.

      https://www.intego.com/mac-security-blog/your-macs-camera-can-be-hacked/

      https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiNuo6UzNfWAhVS1mMKHcbtAjEQFgguMAE&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.macworld.com%2Farticle%2F3129449%2Fsecurity%2Fhow-to-keep-your-macs-camera-from-spying-on-you-no-tape-required.html&usg=AOvVaw3D9L0G57-UNn2Pk_78PrmX

      https://www.cultofmac.com/258855/alarming-study-shows-macs-camera-can-secretly-spy/

      • I didn’t address the issue of whether it could be hacked or not. Anything can be hacked, frankly, given enough time and effort.

        Read my response again.

        Peace,
        Gene

        • dfs says:

          Seems to me that giving the camera an off/on switch — i. e. empowering the individual end user — would be a damn good first step. Since Day One Apple hasn’t lifted a finger to address this issue. Meanwhile, in another part of the forest, my Mac and my iPhone keep pestering me over and over to enter the same passwords as the number of security hoops I am obliged to jump through multiply as fast as Mickey Mouse’s brooms and pails. This is what I call a truly schizophrenic attitude towards security.

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